Detox Foods and Drinks and Their Side Effects

Detox Foods and Drinks and Their Side Effects

Health is a relationship between you and your body. The patient should be made to understand that he or she must take charge of his own life.  Don’t take your body to the doctor as if he were a repair shop. The secret of good health lies in successful adjustment to changing stresses on the body.

Health means different things to different people. Take time to define what health means to you and what you are willing to do or willing to give up doing to bring better health into your life. Investing in your health now can pay dividends for the rest of your life.What is one easy thing you can do today to live healthier?  As the Ancient Chinese philosopher Lao Tzu famously said, “The journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step.”  

Keeping your mind and body free of toxins, free radicals, and other nasty things by removing and eliminating toxins. Detoxifying can help protect you from disease and renew your ability to maintain optimum health. Feed your body with healthy nutrients. These foods will assist in boosting your metabolism, optimizing digestion, while allowing you to lose weight and fortify your immune system. You’ll notice that with many of these detox foods the road to purification goes through the liver, and getting it to full capacity can have several long-lasting benefits throughout the body.

 

1. LEMONS 

This wonderful fruit stimulates the release of enzymes and helps convert toxins into a water-soluble form that can be easily excreted from the body. In addition, they contain high amounts of vitamin C, a vitamin needed by the body to make glutathione. Glutathione helps ensure that phase 2 liver detoxification keeps pace with phase 1, thereby reducing the likelihood of negative effects from environmental chemicals. Try starting your day with hot water and a slice of lemon to help flush out toxins and cleanse your system. Drinking lemon water, which is alkaline-forming, first thing in the morning will help to balance out the acidity of foods we’ve consumed. They also have an incredible effect in detoxing the liver. Fresh lemon juice contains more than 20 anti-cancer compounds and helps balance the body’s pH levels.

Lemon juice may help protect against calcium oxalate urolithiasis, or kidney stones, according to a study published in 2007 in “BMC Urology.” Conducted on rats, the study found that drinking lemon juice prevented kidney calcium levels from rising. The lemon juice was effective even when diluted to a 75 percent concentration.

Side Effects: 

GERD is also known as gastroesphageal reflux disorder, symptoms of which are heartburn, nausea and vomiting. GERD symptoms are triggered by fatty, spicy or acidic foods, of which lemon juice is one. If you have ulcers, the increased acid content may also irritate the stomach lining and stop the ulcer from healing properly.

Because of its high citric acid content, lemon juice can cause tooth enamel to decay. In a study published in 1996 in “Caries Research,” canned lemon juice was found to cause erosion in tooth enamel. This led to stained teeth, a loss of dental tissue and, in some cases, cavities. To reduce the risk of enamel decay from lemon juice, do not drink the juice straight on its own; mix it with other foods and liquids. Proper and regular dental care will keep the acid from wearing away at your teeth. (livestrong)

2. Ginger  

This is one root whose medicinal value dates back to ancient Chinese civilizations, and one that is still believed to offer many health benefits. Often used in a tea or other drink, you can add it to the meals you make as well. It is thought to help the liver function, and has some astringent properties.

Some detox diets ask you to chew on ginger root. You may also find that adding it to hot water makes the water taste better. Basically any way you can think of it get it into your system is going to be beneficial, especially if you’re suffering from a fatty liver caused by too much alcohol, or too many toxic foods and drinks.

Side effects.

In small doses, ginger has few side effects. It may cause:

High doses of ginger — more than 5 grams a day — increase the chances of side effects. Ginger on the skin may cause a rash. (webmd)

 

3. Avocados  

Because of its fiber and antioxidant count this is a food that is making it onto more and more detox lists. At first many shied away from them because of they’re high in fat, but ever since the difference between good fats and bad fats become more commonly known, they are now getting the respect they deserve.

Don’t think that the guacamole you can add to your meal at a fast food restaurant for 50 cents more is going to do the detox trick. Opt for organic avocados and consume them without any other ingredients to get the full benefit of their healthy content.

Side Effects: 

They’re generally safe to eat; in rare cases, however, they may cause allergies. Symptoms include rash, upset stomach, facial swelling and trouble breathing. Those with latex allergies are especially likely to react to avocados, according to the Cleveland Clinic. In addition, the high fat content of avocados makes them relatively heavy in calories, so eating too many avocados could contribute to weight gain.

Most foods will cause weight gain if you eat too much, but avocados are more likely than other fruits to contribute to this side effect. The average avocado contains about 227 calories, so stick to just one-fifth of a fruit to help maintain your weight. For reference, the average woman burns 2,000 calories per day, while the average man burns 2,800 calories per day, according to the American Council on Exercise. A woman who eats two avocados in a day would consume nearly one-fourth of her daily calories from this fruit alone. (livestrong)

4. Lemongrass  

This is an herb that is used in Thailand and other parts of the world as a natural way to cleanse several organs at once. It not only helps the liver but also the kidneys, the bladder, and the entire digestive tract. Benefits of using it in your cooking, or drinking it as a tea include a better complexion, better circulation, and better digestion.

It is most often used as a tea in the world of detoxing, and there are several recipes you can try until you find one that suits your tastes best.

Side Effects: 

With any medicinal herbs, care should be taken when using lemon grass. There are no known adverse reactions or counter-indications for lemon grass with other drugs or dietary supplements. No harmful side effects have been established for long-term use of lemon grass, but moderate initial use is recommended, and it should not be used by women who are pregnant or breast-feeding.

People with kidney or liver diseases should not use lemon grass in any form and people allergic to lemon grass should not use or handle the herb or oil and avoid contact with items or surfaces having had contact with it. For those with slight sensitivity to lemon grass, the oil may be diluted with a neutral base or carrier oil such as safflower oil or sunflower oil.

Caution should be used when handling essential oils; avoid getting lemon grass oil in eyes. Any use should be modified or discontinued if skin rash develops. (herbal supplement resource.com)

5. Garlic 

Garlic has long been known for its heart benefits, however the pungent food is also good at detoxifying the body. Garlic is not only antiviral, antibacterial and antibiotic, but it contains a chemical called allicin which promotes the production of white blood cells and helps fight against toxins. Garlic is best eaten raw, so add some crushed garlic to a salad dressing to boost its flavour and your health at the same time.

One good thing about garlic is that you can up your intake of it without having to worry if your body is going to get used to it or build up a resistance.

Side Effects: 

Although uncommon, allergic reactions to garlic have been reported. Stop taking garlic and seek emergency medical attention if you experience symptoms of a serious allergic reaction including difficulty breathing; closing of your throat; swelling of your lips, tongue, or face; or hives.

Other less serious side effects have also been reported. Talk to your doctor or pharmacist if you experience

  • burning of the mouth, throat, and stomach;
  • nausea or vomiting;
  • diarrhea;
  • sweating;
  • lightheadedness; and
  • eczema or a rash.

Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. (emedicinehealth)

6. Cabbage 

Many celebs have resorted to the cabbage soup diet to help lose weight and get in shape quickly before a big event, however cabbage is not only good for weight loss – it is also an excellent detoxifying food. Like most cruciferous vegetables (including broccoli and sprouts), cabbage contains a chemical called sulforaphane, which helps the body fight against toxins. Cabbage also supplies the body with glutathione; an antioxidant that helps improve the detoxifying function of the liver.

Cabbage belongs to the cruciferous vegetable family and provides a myriad of nutrients, including fiber, folate, calcium, potassium and vitamins A, C and K. Cabbage contains phytonutrients that act as antioxidants to reduce your risk of certain cancers.

Side Effects: 

Eating large quantities of cabbage can cause negative side effects, such as:

Flatulence

Cabbage contains significant quantities of riffinose, an indigestible sugar. This sugar is a type of complex carbohydrate that passes through your intestines undigested and can cause flatulence. Other symptoms associated with flatulence that may result after eating cabbage include belching, abdominal discomfort and bloating.

Diarrhea

Green cabbage contains 5.8 grams of fiber per 1-cup serving, reports Michigan State University. The insoluble fiber in cabbage increases the movement of waste in your digestive tract. Eating too much fiber can contribute to symptoms of diarrhea or block your intestines. Additionally, individuals undergoing cancer treatment may need to avoid eating cabbage, as this vegetable can exacerbate diarrhea often caused by chemotherapy. Consult your treating physician about cabbage consumption if you are undergoing this type of treatment.

Medication Interaction

Cabbage contains high amounts of vitamin K, a vitamin that helps your blood clot. Eating too much cabbage can interfere with blood-thinning medications, but a 2-cup serving of green cabbage should assist in providing the desired amount of vitamin K without inducing negative effects. The recommended daily allowance of vitamin K is 120 micrograms for males and 90 micrograms for females, reports the University of Maryland Medical Center. One cup of green cabbage contains 53 micrograms of vitamin K, while the same serving of red cabbage contains 34 micrograms. According to the University of Michigan Health System, consuming a consistent quantity of foods high in vitamin K and limiting your vitamin K intake to the recommended daily allowance can assist in preventing harmful interactions. Consult your physician about consuming vitamin K foods if you are taking a blood-thinning medication.

Hypothyroidism

Consuming high quantities of cabbage might cause hypothyroidism, according to Linus Pauling Institute. Iodine deficiency coupled with high consumption of cabbage, such as 1,000 to 1,500 grams per day, can result in a lack of thyroid hormone. Glucosinulates are compounds containing sulfur and nitrogen that occur abundantly in cabbage. Chemical reactions with these compounds may interfere with the production of your thyroid hormone or cause the release of a certain ion that competes with iodine uptake. Your thyroid gland needs iodine to function properly. If there are competing processes limiting iodine quantities, this may contribute to the development of hypothyroidism. However, cabbage consumption independent of iodine deficiency does not increase your risk of hypothyroidism, reports Linus Pauling Institute. (healthyeating.sfgate)

8. OLIVE OIL  

Olive is a tree. People use the oil from the fruit and seeds, water extracts of the fruit, and the leaves to make medicine.

Some liver cleanses out there call for olive oil mixed with fruit juice in order to trigger your liver to expunge its gallstones. But aside from that olive oil should be your go-to oil when you’re trying to detox the body. That’s because it has a lot of healthy properties, and makes for a better choice of fat than most of your other options. Just be sure not to cook with it at high heat. Use it as a salad dressing to help things like dark leafy greens go down. Your best choice is always ice-pressed olive oil, but if you can find a very high quality cold-pressed olive oil, although not as nutritious, it will suffice provided the quality is high and not adulterated.

Side Effects and Safety:

Olive oil is LIKELY SAFE when taken appropriately by mouth or applied to the skin. Olive oil can be used safely as 14% of total daily calories. This is about 2 tablespoons (28 grams) daily. Up to 1 liter per week of extra-virgin olive oil has been used safely as part of a Mediterranean-style diet for up to 5.8 years.

Olive oil taken by mouth is well-tolerated. When applied to the skin, delayed allergic responses and contact dermatitis have been reported.

There is insufficient reliable information available about the safety of olive leaf, although so far olive leaf and fruit pulp have not been associated with significant side effects in clinical studies.

Olive trees produce pollen that can cause seasonal respiratory allergy in some people.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: There is not enough reliable information about the safety of taking olive products if you are pregnant or breast-feeding. Do not use amounts greater than the amount commonly found in foods.

Diabetes: Olive oil might lower blood sugar. People with diabetes should check their blood sugar when using olive oil.

Surgery: Olive oil might affect blood sugar. Using olive oil might affect blood sugar control during and after surgery. Stop taking olive oil 2 weeks before surgery. (webmd)

9. ONIONS 

This ubiquitous kitchen staple is as healthy as it is tasty. It’s brimming with sulfur-containing amino acids, which efficiently detox the liver. Raw onions deliver the most health benefits. Even a small amount of “overpeeling” can result in unwanted loss of flavonoids. For example, a red onion can lose about 20% of its quercetin and almost 75% of its anthocyanins if it is “overpeeled”. Onions will soak up arsenic, cadmium, lead, mercury and tin in contaminated foods. The total polyphenol content of onion is not only higher than its fellow allium vegetables, garlic and leeks, but also higher than tomatoes, carrots, and red bell pepper. Onions have been shown to inhibit the activity of macrophages, specialized white blood cells that play a key role in our body’s immune defense system, and one of their defense activities involves the triggering of large-scale inflammatory responses.

Side Effects and Safety:

Onion is LIKELY SAFE when taken by mouth in amounts commonly found in food or when applied to the skin. It is POSSIBLY SAFE for most people when taken by mouth in larger amounts. Taking up to a maximum of 35 mg of the onion ingredient “diphenylamine” per day for several months seems to be safe.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: There is not enough reliable information about the safety of taking onion as a medicine if you are pregnant or breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid using onion in amounts larger than usual food amounts.

Bleeding disorder: Onion might slow blood clotting. There is concern that onion might increase the risk of bleeding when taken as a medicine. Don’t use medicinal amounts of onion or onion extract if you have a bleeding disorder.

Diabetes: Onion might lower blood sugar. If you have diabetes and use onion in medicinal amounts, check your blood sugar carefully.

Surgery: Onion might slow blood clotting and lower blood sugar. In theory, onion might increase the risk for bleeding or interfere with blood sugar control during and after surgical procedures. Stop using onion as a medicine at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.

10. Green tea  

Green tea is a product made from the Camellia sinensis plant. It can be prepared as a beverage, which can have some health effects. Or an “extract” can be made from the leaves to use as medicine.

Green tea is used to improve mental alertness and thinking.

It is also used for weight loss and to treat stomach disorders, vomiting, diarrhea,headaches, bone loss (osteoporosis), and solid tumor cancers.

Some people use green tea to prevent various cancers, including breast cancer,prostate cancer, colon cancer, gastric cancer, lung cancer, solid tumor cancers andskin cancer related to exposure to sunlight. Some women use green tea to fight human papilloma virus (HPV), which can cause genital warts, the growth of abnormal cells in the cervix (cervical dysplasia), and cervical cancer.

Green tea is also used for Crohn’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, diseases of theheart and blood vessels, diabetes, low blood pressure, chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), dental cavities (caries), kidney stones, and skin damage.

Instead of drinking green tea, some people apply green tea bags to their skin to soothe sunburn and prevent skin cancer due to sun exposure. Green tea bags are also used to decrease puffiness under the eyes, as a compress for tired eyes or headache, and to stop gums from bleeding after a tooth is pulled.

Green tea in candy is used for gum disease.

Green tea is used in an ointment for genital warts. Do not confuse green tea with oolong tea or black tea. Oolong tea and black tea are made from the same plant leaves used to make green tea, but they are prepared differently and have different medicinal effects. Green tea is not fermented at all. Oolong tea is partially fermented, and black tea is fully fermented.

How does it work?

The useful parts of green tea are the leaf bud, leaf, and stem. Green tea is not fermented and is produced by steaming fresh leaves at high temperatures. During this process, it is able to maintain important molecules called polyphenols, which seem to be responsible for many of the benefits of green tea.

Polyphenols might be able to prevent inflammation and swelling, protect cartilage between the bones, and lessen joint degeneration. They also seem to be able to fight human papilloma virus (HPV) infections and reduce the growth of abnormal cells in the cervix (cervical dysplasia). Research cannot yet explain how this works.

Green tea contains 2% to 4% caffeine, which affects thinking and alertness, increases urine output, and may improve the function of brain messengers important in Parkinson’s disease. Caffeine is thought to stimulate the nervous system, heart, and muscles by increasing the release of certain chemicals in the brain called “neurotransmitters.”

Antioxidants and other substances in green tea might help protect the heart and blood vessels.

Green tea is not only a good weight-loss drink, but it is extremely high in antioxidants. Research has also suggested that drinking green tea can protect the liver from diseases including fatty liver disease. Green tea contains antioxidants called catechins that are derived from plants, because it is very useful for cleansing the liver to perform the function.

Side Effects: 

These side effects can range from mild to serious and include headache,nervousness, sleep problems, vomiting, diarrhea, irritability, irregular heartbeat, tremor, heartburn, dizziness, ringing in the ears, convulsions, and confusion. Green tea seems to reduce the absorption of iron from food.

Green tea is LIKELY SAFE for most adults when consumed in moderate amounts. Green tea extract is POSSIBLY SAFE for most people when taken by mouth or applied to the skin for a short time. In some people, green tea can cause stomach upset and constipation. Green tea extracts have been reported to cause liver problems in rare cases.

Drinking too much green tea — more than five cups per day, for example — isPOSSIBLY UNSAFE. It can cause side effects because of the caffeine. These side effects can range from mild to serious and include headache, nervousness, sleep problems, vomiting, diarrhea, irritability, irregular heartbeat, tremor, heartburn, dizziness, ringing in the ears, convulsions, and confusion. Green tea seems to reduce the absorption of iron from food. Drinking very high doses of green tea is LIKELY UNSAFE and can actually be fatal. The fatal dose of caffeine in green tea is estimated to be 10-14 grams (150-200 mg per kilogram). Serious toxicity can occur at lower doses.

Caffeine is POSSIBLY SAFE in children in amounts commonly found in foods.

Green tea interacts with many medications, as explained below.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: If you are pregnant or breast-feeding, green tea in small amounts – about 2 cups per day – is POSSIBLY SAFE. This amount of green tea provides about 200 mg of caffeine. However, drinking more than 2 cups of green tea per day is POSSIBLY UNSAFE. Consuming more than 2 cups of green tea daily has been linked to an increased risk of miscarriage and other negative effects. Also, caffeine passes into breast milk and can affect a nursing infant. Don’t drink an excessive amount of green tea if you are pregnant or breast-feeding.

“Tired blood” (anemia): Drinking green tea may make anemia worse.

Anxiety disorders: The caffeine in green tea might make anxiety worse.

Bleeding disorders: Caffeine in green tea might increase the risk of bleeding. Don’t drink green tea if you have a bleeding disorder.

Heart conditions: Caffeine in green tea might cause irregular heartbeat.

Diabetes: Caffeine in green tea might affect blood sugar control. If you drink green tea and have diabetes, monitor your blood sugar carefully.

Diarrhea. Green tea contains caffeine. The caffeine in green tea, especially when taken in large amounts, can worsen diarrhea.

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS): Green tea contains caffeine. The caffeine in green tea, especially when taken in large amounts, can worsen diarrhea and might worsen symptoms of IBS.

Glaucoma: Drinking green tea increases pressure inside the eye. The increase occurs within 30 minutes and lasts for at least 90 minutes.

High blood pressure: The caffeine in green tea might increase blood pressure in people with high blood pressure. However, this does not seem to occur in people who regularly drink green tea or other products that contain caffeine.

Liver disease: Green tea extract supplements have been linked to several cases of liver damage. Green tea extracts might make liver disease worse.

Weak bones (osteoporosis): Drinking green tea can increase the amount of calcium that is flushed out in the urine. Caffeine should be limited to less than 300 mg per day (approximately 2-3 cups of green tea). It is possible to make up for some calcium loss caused by caffeine by taking calcium supplements.

11. TURMERIC  

Turmeric is a plant. You probably know turmeric as the main spice in curry. It has a warm, bitter taste and is frequently used to flavor or color curry powders, mustards, butters, and cheeses. But the root of turmeric is also used widely to make medicine.

Curcumin is the active ingredient in the spice turmeric, which gives it its yellow color. The rate at which your detox pathways function depends on your genes, your age, lifestyle and a good supply of nutrients involved in the detox process. Curcumin is used a lot in Ayurvedic Medicine to treat liver and digestive disorders. Turmeric has specifically been studied in relation to the positive effect that it has on the liver. As a high antioxidant spice, turmeric protects the body and prevents disease more effectively than drug based treatments and without the side effects.

Turmeric is one of the most powerful foods to maintain a healthy heart, which actively protects the liver against toxic damage and regenerate liver cells are damaged. Turmeric also increase the natural production of bile, liver channels magnifying shrink and improve liver function.

How does it work?

The chemicals in turmeric might decrease swelling (inflammation).

Side Effects:

Turmeric is LIKELY SAFE when taken by mouth or applied to the skin appropriately for up to 8 months.

Turmeric usually does not cause significant side effects; however, some people can experience stomach upset, nausea, dizziness, or diarrhea.

In one report, a person who took very high amounts of turmeric, over 1500 mg twice daily, experienced a dangerous abnormal heart rhythm. However, it is unclear if turmeric was the actual cause of this side effect. Until more is known, avoid taking excessively large doses of turmeric.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: During pregnancy and while breast-feeding, turmeric is LIKELY SAFE when taken by mouth in amounts commonly found in food. However, turmeric is LIKELY UNSAFE when taken by mouth in medicinal amounts during pregnancy. It might promote a menstrual period or stimulate the uterus, putting the pregnancy at risk. Do not take medicinal amounts of turmeric if you are pregnant. There is not enough information to rate the safety of medicinal amounts of turmeric during breast-feeding. It is best not to use it.

Gallbladder problems: Turmeric can make gallbladder problems worse. Do not use turmeric if you have gallstones or a bile duct obstruction.

Bleeding problems: Taking turmeric might slow blood clotting. This might increase the risk of bruising and bleeding in people with bleeding disorders.

Diabetes: Curcumin, a chemical in turmeric, might decrease blood sugar in people with diabetes. Use with caution in people with diabetes as it might make blood sugar too low.

A stomach disorder called gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD): Turmeric can cause stomach upset in some people. It might make stomach problems such as GERD worse. Do not take turmeric if it worsens symptoms of GERD.

Hormone-sensitive condition such as breast cancer, uterine cancer, ovarian cancer, endometriosis, or uterine fibroids: Turmeric contains a chemical called curcumin, which might act like the hormone estrogen. In theory, turmeric might make hormone-sensitive conditions worse. However, some research shows that turmeric reduces the effects of estrogen in some hormone-sensitive cancer cells. Therefore, turmeric might have beneficial effects on hormone-sensitive conditions. Until more is known, use cautiously if you have a condition that might be made worse by exposure to hormones.

Infertility: Turmeric might lower testosterone levels and decrease sperm movement when taken by mouth by men. This might reduce fertility. Turmeric should be used cautiously by people trying to have a baby.

Iron deficiency: Taking high amounts of turmeric might prevent the absorption of iron. Turmeric should be used with caution in people with iron deficiency.

Surgery: Turmeric might slow blood clotting. It might cause extra bleeding during and after surgery. Stop using turmeric at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.

12. Beetroot  

Beet is a plant. The root is used in natural medicines.

For those needing a quick health-boosting shot of nutrients, you can’t do much better than beetroot. Packed with magnesium, iron and vitamin C, the vegetable has recently been hailed as a superfood due to its many reported health benefits. Not only is beetroot great for skin, hair and cholesterol levels, but it can also help support liver detoxification, making it an ultimate detox food. To enjoy its benefits, try adding raw beetroot to salads or sipping on some beetroot juice.

Beetroot juice is taken for many purposes, from aphrodisiac use to boosting exercise capacity to supporting liver and eye health. The supplement is rich in vitamin C, magnesium, manganese, potassium, bioflavonoids and beta-carotene. A concentrated beetroot extract, called betaine, is taken to maximize liver detoxification, to boost natural production of hormones in the body that promote the feelings of well-being and relaxation, and to remove excess homocysteine in the urine and blood. Homocysteine is related to a higher risk for heart disease. Both forms of beetroot can have side effects.

Side Effects: 

Excessive consumption of beetroot should be avoided by people with hemochromatosis or Wilson disease due to the potential for copper and iron accumulation, advises Drugs.com. Hemochromatosis is a form of iron overload disease, while Wilson disease is a disorder that prevents a person’s body from ridding itself of excess copper, according to the National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse.

Beet is LIKELY SAFE for most people when taken in the amounts typically found in foods. Beet is POSSIBLY SAFE for most people when taken by mouth in medicinal amounts.

Beets can cause low calcium levels and kidney damage.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: It’s not known whether it’s safe to use beet in larger medicinal amounts during pregnancy or breast-feeding. Stick to food amounts.

Kidney disease: Eating too many beets might make kidney disease worse. (livestrong)

13. Wheatgrass   

Wheatgrass restores alkalinity to the blood. The juice’s abundance of alkaline minerals helps reduce over-acidity in the blood and thus also Is a powerful detoxifier, and liver protector. It increases red blood-cell count and lowers blood pressure. It also cleanses the organs and gastrointestinal tract of debris. Wheatgrass stimulates the metabolism and the body’s enzyme systems by enriching the blood. It also aids in reducing blood pressure by dilating the blood pathways throughout the body. Pound for pound, wheatgrass is more than twenty times denser in nutrients than other choice vegetables. Nutritionally, wheatgrass is a complete food that contains 98 of the 102 earth elements.

Side Effects: 

Wheatgrass is LIKELY SAFE when taken in food amounts. It is POSSIBLY SAFE for most adults when taken by mouth in medicinal amounts for up to 18 months or when applied to the skin as a cream for up to 6 weeks. Not enough is known about the safety of long-term use of wheatgrass as medicine.

Wheatgrass can cause nausea, appetite loss, and constipation.

Special Precautions & Warnings: 

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: There is not enough reliable information about the safety of taking wheatgrass if you are pregnant or breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use. (webmd)

14. Kale  

Dr. Oz includes kale in his 48 Hour Weekend Cleanse and recommends blending it up in a shake. However you choose to get it into your body, the benefits are that it contains plenty of nutrients, and also acts as a way to help flush out the kidneys, a set of organs that must be cleansed on any good detox effort.

This vegetable is so good for you that it is often recommended to patients that are following a doctor recommended diet when fighting kidney disease. It’s packed with so many antioxidants and has anti-inflammatory properties as well, not to mention all of the vitamins and minerals it contains.

3 Side Effects: 

1 Kale contains too much fibre for some people’s digestive systems 

It contains about 2.6 grams per cup, which is about 14 per cent of an adult’s recommended daily intake. Fibre is not digested and remains in our digestive tract, where it helps with the passage of food through our digestive system. Which is a good thing, usually.

But it’s this high-fibre content that could cause problems for your digestion, especially if you have IBS (irritable bowel syndrome) or other unexplained digestive issues.

Most of the fibre in kale is insoluble fibre – the type found in wholegrains, bran and nuts and seeds – and too much of it can be difficult for your digestive system to cope with. When it is not properly processed it gets stuck in the gut causing increased fermentation, which in turn causes problems such as bloating and gas.

2 Kale contains a sugar called raffinose, which is hard for us to break down

Raffinose belongs to a group of carbohydrates called oligosaccharides, meaning it is made up of several sugar molecules hooked together. It is found in cruciferous vegetables (the group that includes kale, cabbage and broccoli) as well as beans and legumes.

We lack the right enzymes to digest raffinose in our stomach or small intestine. So after passing through these organs it arrives in the large intestine still intact, and is then fermented by the bacteria there. Though it can ‘feed’ our good bacteria and encourage their growth, this fermentation also produces gases such as methane and carbon dioxide, which cause the well-known problems of bloating and flatulence that some people get after eating these foods.

3 Raw kale can affect your thyroid gland function

Like other cruciferous vegetables, kale contains small amounts of substances that can have a ‘goitrogenic’ effect, meaning they can affect the function of our thyroid gland. These substances become inactive with cooking, but they are still active in raw kale.

No one should overdo raw kale. Most of us are OK if we stick to modest amounts, such as a handful in a smoothie or juice, even on a daily basis. But if you have existing thyroid problems it’s safest to stick to cooked kale.

So who shouldn’t eat kale?

If you get gas or bloating when you eat kale, cabbage or beans it’s best to avoid all aggravating foods, including kale, to give the digestive system a chance to recover. Likewise people with IBS, those with weak digestion, or if you have any sort of digestive discomfort where you can’t pinpoint the problem food.

As with any food, eat mindfully, become aware of how different foods affect you personally, rather than going on what others tell you is ‘healthy’, and if something is not digested easily (with no gas, gurgling, rumbling, cramps, constipation, acidity or bloating), act on what your body is telling you. (high50.com)

15. PARSLEY  

Parsley is an herb. The leaf, seed, and root are used to make medicine. Be careful not to confuse parsley with fool’s parsley and parsley piert.

Those pretty green leaves don’t just make your plate look great. Parsley boasts plenty of beta-carotene and vitamins A, C and K to protect your kidneys and bladder. Diuretic herbs such as parsley prevent problems such as kidney stones and bladder infections and keep our body’s plumbing running smoothly by causing it to produce more urine. They also relieve bloating during menstruation. The flavonoids in parsley–especially luteolin–have been shown to function as antioxidants that combine with highly reactive oxygen-containing molecules (called oxygen radicals) and help prevent oxygen-based damage to cells. In addition, extracts from parsley have been used in animal studies to help increase the antioxidant capacity of the blood.

Parsley is used for urinary tract infections (UTIs), kidney stones (nephrolithiasis), gastrointestinal (GI) disorders, constipation, jaundice, intestinal gas (flatulence),indigestion, colic, diabetes, cough, asthma, fluid retention (edema), osteoarthritis, “tired blood” (anemia), high blood pressure, prostate conditions, and spleenconditions. It is also used to start menstrual flow, to cause an abortion, as an aphrodisiac, and as a breath freshener.

Some people apply parsley directly to the skin for cracked or chapped skin, bruises, tumors, insect bites, lice, parasites, and to stimulate hair growth.

In foods and beverages, parsley is widely used as a garnish, condiment, food, and flavoring.

In manufacturing, parsley seed oil is used as a fragrance in soaps, cosmetics, and perfumes.

How does it work?

Parsley might help stimulate the appetite, improve digestion, increase urine production, reduce spasms, and increase menstrual flow.

Side Effects: 

Parsley is LIKELY SAFE when consumed in amounts commonly found in food.

Parsley is POSSIBLY SAFE for most adults when taken by mouth as medicine, short-term. In some people, parsley can cause allergic skin reactions.

Consuming very large amounts of parsley is LIKELY UNSAFE, as this can cause other side effects like “tired blood” (anemia) and liver or kidney problems.

Also, parsley seed oil applied to the skin is LIKELY UNSAFE as it can cause the skin to become extra sensitive to the sun and cause a rash. Not enough is known about the safety of applying parsley root and leaf to the skin.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Parsley in food amounts is fine, but parsley in larger medicinal amounts is LIKELY UNSAFE when taken by mouth during pregnancy. Parsley has been used to cause an abortion and to start menstrual flow. In addition, developing evidence suggests that taking An-Tai-Yin, an herbal combination product containing parsley and dong quai, during the first three months of pregnancy increases the risk of serious birth defects. If you are pregnant, stick with using only the amount of parsley typically found in food.

Not enough is known about the safety of using parsley in medicinal amounts during breast-feeding. It’s best not to use more than typical food amounts of parsley.

Diabetes: Parsley might lower blood sugar levels. Watch for signs of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) and monitor your blood sugar carefully if you have diabetes and use parsley.

Fluid retention (edema): There is a concern that parsley might cause the body to hold onto sodium (salt), and this increases water retention.

High blood pressure: There is a concern that parsley might cause the body to hold onto sodium (salt), and this could make high blood pressure worse.

Kidney disease: Don’t take parsley if you have kidney disease. Parsley contains chemicals that can make kidney disease worse.

Surgery: Parsley might lower blood glucose levels and could interfere with blood sugar control during and after surgical procedures. Stop using parsley at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery. ( webmd)

16. PINEAPPLES  

This tropical delight contains bromelain, a digestive enzyme that helps cleanse your colon and improve digestion. Excessive inflammation, excessive coagulation of the blood, and certain types of tumor growth may all be reduced by bromelain. Two molecules isolated from an extract of crushed pineapple stems have even shown promise in fighting cancer growth.

Side Effects and warnings: 

There are some important warnings and side effects associated with pineapple juice. These should be taken care of before drinking the juice. Pineapple juice contains a powerful enzyme called bromelain that may cause diarrhea, stomach disorders, and show quick ill response to allergic person.

Pineapple juice precautions

  1. During pregnancy period, one should avoid pineapple juice as it leads to the contraction of uterus, which may cause miscarriage. Uterine contraction may also lead to increased menstrual flow.
  2. Bromelain may cause abortions.
  3. Excess pineapple or pineapple juice should be avoided. It can show bad effects on tooth enamel and gums and may cause to gingivitis and cavities.
  4. Bromelain interferes with blood clotting and blood thinning drugs.
  5. The person, who is detected with diabetes, should avoid taking pineapple juice as it is associated with high in sugar and calories. Obese person should also skip it.
  6. If you want more roughage and fiber, it is suggested to use pineapple as a whole instead of taking pineapple juice.
  7. If you have allergic symptoms, it is wise to stop taking bromelain.

Pineapple juice side effects

  1. Proper ripened pineapple juice should be consumed because the raw fruit juice is extremely harmful for the body may invite other complications including throat problems.
  2. Applying slice of pineapple over the face is good to remove moles, acne, pimples and wrinkles. But one shouldn’t leave the pineapple applied portion for more than 5 minutes because the presence of alpha hydroxyl acid may harm and burn the skin.
  3. Eating more amount of pineapple leads to swelling on the lips, cheeks and tongue.
  4. Sometimes, eating pineapple shows breathing difficulties, especially with allergic person.
  5. Bromelain breaks down protein, so, it should be avoided by those who want his/her muscle size/strength.
  6. Excessive drinking of pineapple juice destroys mouth mucous membrane and stops mucus formation in the mouth.
  7. Use of more and more of pineapple can cause the formation of fiber balls in the digestive tract.

Pineapple juice warnings

  1. Pineapple juice shouldn’t be taken in large quantity.
  2. One may experience vomiting and diarrhea of excess use of the juice.
  3. Breast feeding mother should avoid the use of pineapple.
  4. While applying pineapple juice over the face, one should take utmost precautions for eyes. Pineapple juice shouldn’t spread into eyes as the alpha hydroxyl acid may harm the eyes seriously.
  5. If somebody is going for surgery, the concerned person should avoid taking pineapple before and after a fortnight.
  6. Use fresh pineapple juice instead of shop one because the fresh juice contains more number of nutrients and in the commercial juice, bromelain gets destroy due to commercial heating thereby the user lacks important benefits of pineapple juice. (gyanunlimited)

17. Water   

Water is often overlooked but is so important for all of your organs, and for flushing toxins out of your body. If you’re exercising and taking saunas to help release the toxins it becomes even more important to stay hydrated.

If you’re not used to drinking water daily, be sure to only increase your intake by one cup at a time so you don’t overload yourself. Your kidneys won’t know what to do if they’re not used to getting water and then get a ton of it.

17. SEAWEED 

 

 

Seaweed may be the most underrated vegetable in the Western world. Studies at McGill University in Montreal showed that seaweeds bind to radioactive waste in the body so it can be removed. Radioactive waste can find its way into the body through some medical tests or through food that has been grown where water or soil is contaminated. Seaweed also binds to heavy metals to help eliminate them from the body. In addition, it is a powerhouse of minerals and trace minerals. Seaweed extracts can help you lose weight, mostly body fat.

Medication Interactions

Most medications don’t interact with seaweed, with the exception of blood thinners, including warfarin. Seaweed can be high in vitamin K, and many blood thinners work by interfering with the actions of vitamin K. Increase your vitamin K intake, and you may also need to increase your medication dosage for it to remain effective. (livestrong)

17. GRAPEFRUIT 

 

Grapefruit is a citrus fruit. People use the fruit, oil from the peel, and extracts from the seed as medicine. Grapefruit seed extract is processed from grapefruit seeds and pulp obtained as a byproduct from grapefruit juice production. Vegetable glycerin is added to the final product to reduce acidity and bitterness.

Grapefruits can prevent weight gain, treat diabetes, lower cholesterol, fight cancer, “hardening of the arteries” (atherosclerosis), heal stomach ulcers, reduce gum disease and even keep stroke and metabolic syndrome at bay. Grapefruits can treat disease as well as pharmaceuticals without the side effects. The rich pink and red colors of grapefruit are due to lycopene, a carotenoid phytonutrient. Among the common dietary carotenoids, lycopene has the highest capacity to help fight oxygen free radicals, which are compounds that can damage cells. The big takeaway on grapefruit is that it gets your liver fired up and ready for action, while infusing the rest of your organs with nutrient-laden fruit juice.

18. Brown rice 

Brown rice is “unpolished” white rice. Brown rice retains unsaturated fatty acids, protein, minerals, vitamins, and starch that are usually removed during polishing. It is eaten as food and taken as medicine.

If you want to cleanse your system and boost your health, it is a good idea to cut down on processed foods. Instead, try supplementing your diet with healthier whole grains such as brown rice, which is rich in many key detoxifying nutrients including B vitamins, magnesium, manganese and phosphorous. Brown rice is also high in fiber, which is good for cleansing the colon, and rich in selenium, which can help to protect the liver as well as improving the complexion.

How does it work?

It is not known how brown rice might work for medical conditions. Developing research suggests brown rice might help prevent some of the heart-related complications of diabetes. There is also some evidence that it might keep some kinds of cancer cells from multiplying.

Side effects: 

Brown rice is safe for most people when consumed in amounts commonly found in foods.

But, there isn’t enough information to know whether brown rice in medicinal amounts is safe.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Brown rice is safe in amounts found in food, but there’s not enough information to know if it’s safe in the larger amounts that are used as medicine. (webmd)

19. Watercress  

 

 

Watercress is a plant. The parts that grow above the ground are used to make medicine.

Watercress is used for swollen breathing passages in the lung, coughs, bronchitis, flu, and swine flu. Other uses include treating baldness, constipation, parasitic worms,cancer, goiter, polyps, scurvy, and tuberculosis. Watercress is also used to improve appetite and digestion, to enhance sexual arousal, to kill germs, and as a “Spring tonic.” Women sometimes use it to cause an abortion.

Some people apply watercress directly to the skin for arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis,earache, eczema, scabies, and warts.

In foods, watercress is widely used in leaf salads and as a culinary spice.

How does it work?

Watercress may be able to fight bacteria. It can also increase the amount of urine produced by the body (diuretic).

Side Effect:  

Watercress seems safe for most people in food amounts and in medicinal amounts when used short-term. When used in large amounts or long-term, it can causestomach upset or kidney problems.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Children: Watercress is UNSAFE for use as a medicine in children, especially in those younger than four years old.

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Watercress is UNSAFE in medicinal amounts during pregnancy. It might start menstruation and cause a miscarriage. Not enough is known about the use of watercress during breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Stomach or intestinal ulcers: Don’t use watercress if you have stomach or intestinal ulcers.

Kidney disease: Don’t use watercress if you have kidney disease. (webmd)

20. Artichoke 

Artichoke is a plant. The leaf, stem, and root are used to make “extracts” which contain a high concentration of certain chemicals found in the plant. These extracts are used as medicine.

Artichoke is used to stimulate the flow of bile from the liver, and this is thought to help reduce the symptoms of heartburn and alcohol “hangover.” Artichoke is also used forhigh cholesterol, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), kidney problems, anemia, fluid retention (edema), arthritis, bladder infections, and liver problems.

Some people use artichoke for treating snakebites, preventing gallstones, loweringblood pressure, lowering blood sugar; to increase urine flow; and as a tonic or stimulant.

In foods, artichoke leaves and extracts are used to flavor beverages. Cynarin and chlorogenic acid, which are chemicals found in artichoke, are sometimes used as sweeteners.

Don’t confuse artichoke with Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus).

How does it work?

Artichoke has chemicals that can reduce nausea and vomiting, spasms, and intestinal gas. These chemicals have also been shown to lower cholesterol.

Side Effects: 

Artichoke is LIKELY SAFE when consumed in amounts used in foods.

Artichoke is POSSIBLY SAFE when taken by mouth as a medicine. It has been used safely in research for up to 23 months.

In some people, artichoke can cause some side effects such as intestinal gas and allergic reactions. People at the greatest risk of allergic reactions are those who are allergic to plants such as marigolds, daisies, and other similar herbs.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: There is not enough reliable information about the safety of taking artichoke if you are pregnant or breast feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Bile duct obstruction: There is concern that artichoke might worsen bile duct obstruction by increasing bile flow. If you have this condition, don’t use artichoke without first discussing your decision with your healthcare provider.

Allergy to ragweed and related plants: Artichoke may cause an allergic reaction in people who are sensitive to the Asteraceae/Compositae family. Members of this family include ragweed, chrysanthemums, marigolds, daisies, and many others. If you have allergies, be sure to check with your healthcare provider before taking artichoke.

Gallstones: Artichoke might make gallstones worse by increasing bile flow; use artichoke with caution. (webmd)

 

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