Wise Woman :  50 Photos of Women Who Changed The World

Wise Woman : 50 Photos of Women Who Changed The World

 

A wise woman does not allow her success be defined as who she is to a man.

Better to be strong than pretty and useless.

The thing women have yet to learn is nobody gives you power. You just take it.

The thing women have yet to learn is nobody gives you power. You just take it.


A wise woman does not allow her success be defined as who she is to a man.


You have to be unique and different to shine in your own way.


Better to be strong than pretty and useless.


The thing women have yet to learn is nobody gives you power. You just take it.


Committing yourself is a way of finding out who you are. A man finds his identity by identifying.


Consult not your fears but your hopes and your dreams. Think not about your frustrations, but about your unfulfilled potential. Concern yourself not with what you tried and failed in, but with what it is still possible for you to do.–Pope John XXIII

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Women who changed the world 

Cleopatra: (69 – 30 BC) The last Ptolemaic ruler of Egypt. Cleopatra sought to defend Egypt from the expanding Roman Empire. In doing so she formed relationships with two of Rome’s most powerful leaders Marc Anthony and Julius Caesar.

Mary Magdalene: (4 BC – 40AD) Accounts from the Gospels and other sources suggest Mary Magdalene was one of Jesus’ most devoted followers. Mary Magdalene stood near Jesus at his crucifixion and was the first to see his resurrection.

Boudicca: (1st Century AD) Boudicca was an inspirational leader of the Britons. She led several tribes in revolt against the Roman occupation. Initially successful her army of 100,000 sacked Colchester and then London. Her army was later defeated.

Joan of Arc: (1412 – 1431) The patron saint of France, Joan of Arc inspired a French revolt against the occupation of the English. An unlikely heroine; at the age of just 17, the diminutive Joan successfully led the French to victory at Orleans. Her later trial and martyrdom only heightened her mystique.

Mirabai: (1498-1565) Indian mystic and poet. Mirabai was born into a privileged Hindu family, but she forsook the expectations of a princess and spent her time as a mystic and devotee of Krishna. She helped revitalise the tradition of bhakti (devotional) yoga in India.

 

Elizabeth I: (1533 – 1603) Queen of England during a time of great economic and social change, she saw England cemented as a Protestant country. During her reign she witnessed the defeat of the Spanish Armada leaving Britain to later become one of the world’s dominant superpowers.

Harriet Beecher Stowe: (1811 – 1896) A life long anti slavery campaigner. Her novel “Uncle Tom’s Cabin” was a best seller and helped to popularise the anti slavery campaign. Abraham Lincoln would later remark her books were a major factor behind the American civil war.

Florence Nightingale: (1820 – 1910) British nurse. By serving in the Crimean war, Florence Nightingale was instrumental in changing the role and perception of the nursing profession. Her dedicated service won widespread admiration and led to a significant improvement in the treatment of wounded soldiers.

Marie Curie: (1867 – 1934) – Polish / French scientist. Curie was the first women to receive the Nobel Prize and the first person to win the Nobel Prize for two separate categories. Her first award was for research into radioactivity (Physics 1903). Her second Nobel prize was for Chemistry in 1911. A few years later she also helped develop the first X ray machines.

Emily Murphy: (1868 – 1933) – The first women magistrate in the British Empire. In 1927 she joined forces with four other Canadian women who sought to challenge an old Canadian law that said, “women should not be counted as persons”

Rosa Luxemburg: (1870-1919) Polish / German Marxist revolutionary, Rosa Luxemburg sought to bring social revolution to Germany. She wrote fiercely against German imperialism and for international socialism. In 1919, she was murdered after a failed attempt to bring about a Communist revolution in Germany.

Eleanor Roosevelt: (1884 – 1962) Wife and political aide of American president F.D.Roosevelt. In her own right Eleanor made a significant contribution to the field of human rights, a topic she campaigned upon throughout her life. As head of UN human rights commission she helped to draft the 1948 UN declaration of human rights.

Simone de Beauvoir: (1908 – 1986) – French existentialist philosopher. Simone de Beauvoir developed a close personal and intellectual relationship with Jean Paul Satre. Her book “The Second Sex” depicted the traditions of sexism that dominated society and history. It was a defining book for the feminist movement.

Mother Teresa: (1910 – 1997) – Albanian nun/ charity work. Devoting her life to the service of the poor and dispossessed Mother Teresa became a global icon for selfless service to others. Through her Missionary of Charities organisation she personally cared for thousands of sick and dying people in Calcutta. She was awarded the Nobel Peace prize in 1979.

 

 

Queen Elizabeth II(1926 – ) Since ascending to the British throne in 1952, Elizabeth has served as the second longest serving British monarch. She has witnessed rapid social and economic change and has been a unifying influence for Britain and the Commonwealth.

Indira Gandhi: (1917 – 1984) – First female prime minister of India. She was in power from between 1966-77 and 1980-84. Accused of authoritarian tendencies she only narrowly avoided a military coup by agreeing to hold an election at the end of the “emergency period” of 1977. She was assassinated in 1984 by her Sikh bodyguards, in response to her storming of the Golden Temple.

Eva Peron (1919 – 1952) – Eva Peron was widely loved by the ordinary people of Argentina. She campaigned tirelessly for both the poor and for the extension of women’s rights. She died aged only 32 in 1952.

Margaret Thatcher (1925 – 2013) The first female Prime minister of Great Britain, she governed for over 10 years, putting emphasis on individual responsibility and a belief in free markets.

Marilyn Monroe (1926 – 1962) American actress who became one of the most iconic film legends. Her films were moderately successful, but her lasting fame came through her photogenic good looks and aura of glamour and sophistication.

 

Audrey Hepburn: (1929 – 1993) – British actress. Influential female actor of the 1950s and 60s. Audrey Hepburn defined feminine glamour and dignity, and was later voted as most beautiful women of the twentieth century. After her acting career ended in the mid 1960s, she devoted the remaining period of her life to humanitarian work with UNICEF.

Germaine Greer (1939 – ) Australian feminist icon of the 1960s and 1970s, Germaine Greer enjoys raising contentious issues. In particular her book “The Female Eunuch” was a defining manifesto for the feminist movement, which proved influential in the 1960s.

Wangari Maathai (1940 – 2011 ) Kenyan born environmentalist, pro-democracy activist and women’s rights campaigner. Awarded Nobel Peace Prize for efforts to prevent conflict through protection of scarce resources.

Shirin Ebadi (1947- ) An Iranian lawyer, Ebadi has fought for human rights in Iran – representing political dissidents and founding initiatives to promote democracy and human rights. Awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 2003.

Benazir Bhutto (1953 – 2007) The first female prime minister of a Muslim country. She helped to move Pakistan from a dictatorship to democracy becoming Prime Minister in 1988. She sought to implement social reforms, in particular helping women and the poor. She was assassinated in 2007.

Oprah Winfrey (1954 – ) – American chat show host. Oprah Winfrey was the first women to own her own talk show host. Her show and book club are very influential, focusing on issues facing American women.

Madonna (1958 – ) American pop star. Madonna is the most successful female musician of all time. She has sold in excess of 250 million records. She has also starred in films, such as Evita.

Diana, Princess of Wales (1961-1997) – British Royal princess who was noted for her humanitarian charity work. Despite troubled marriage to Prince Charles, she was popular for her natural sympathy with the poor and marginalised from society.

J.K.Rowling (1965 – ) British author of the phenomenal best selling Harry Potter series. The volume of sales was so high, it has been credited with leading a revival of reading by children. She wrote the first book as a single mother, struggling to make ends meet, but is now one of most successful self-made woman.

Tegla Loroupe (1973 – ) Kenyan athlete. Loroupe held the women’s marathon world record and won many prestigious marathons. Since retiring from running, she has devoted herself to various initiatives promoting peace, education and women’s rights. In her native Kenya, her Peace Race and Peace Foundation have been widely praised for helping to end tribal conflict.

Malala Yousafzai (1997 – ) Pakistani schoolgirl who defied threats of the Taliban to campaign for the right to education. She survived being shot in the head by the Taliban and has become a global advocate for women’s rights, especially the right to education.

 

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